St. Valentine’s Day Fun Facts & Superstitions

valentines day

If your celebrating St. Valentines Day… then Happy St. Valentine’s Day!

If your celebrating Single Awareness Day… then Happy Singles Awareness Day!

Celebrate Star Wars Valentine’s Day?

Storm Trooper Star Wars Valentines Day - John Soliman and Associates HomeXpress Realty Inc

However you are celebrating we pulled out some of the interesting facts & superstitions about St. Valentine’s Day that just fancied our curiosity and we thought it might yours too!

  • About 1 billion Valentine’s Day cards are exchanged in US each year. That’s the largest seasonal card-sending occasion of the year, next to Christmas.
  • Women purchase 85% of all valentines. – Come on guys, your slacking!
  • In order of popularity, Valentine’s Day cards are given to teachers, children, mothers, wives, sweethearts and pets.
  • About 3% of pet owners will give Valentine’s Day gifts to their pets.
  • Worldwide, over 50 million roses are given for Valentine’s Day each year.
  • In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who their valentines would be. They would wear these names on their sleeves for one week. To wear your heart on your sleeve now means that it is easy for other people to know how you are feeling.
  • The Italian city of Verona, where Shakespeare’s lovers Romeo and Juliet lived, receives about 1,000 letters addressed to Juliet every Valentine’s Day.
  • Richard Cadbury invented the first Valentines Day candy box in the late 1800s.
  • Alexander Graham Bell applied for his patent on the telephone, an “Improvement in Telegraphy”, on Valentine’s Day, 1876.
  • Amongst the earliest Valentine’s Day gifts were candies. The most common were chocolates in heart shaped boxes.
  • In some countries, a young woman may receive a gift of clothing from a prospective suitor. If the gift is kept, then it means she has accepted his proposal of marriage
  • In Medieval times, girls ate unusual foods on St Valentine’s Day to make them dream of their future husband.

6 Surprising Facts About St. Valentine

1. The St. Valentine who inspired the holiday may have been two different men.
Officially recognized by the Roman Catholic Church, St. Valentine is known to be a real person who died around A.D. 270. However, his true identity was questioned as early as A.D. 496 by Pope Gelasius I, who referred to the martyr and his acts as “being known only to God.” One account from the 1400s describes Valentine as a temple priest who was beheaded near Rome by the emperor Claudius II for helping Christian couples wed. A different account claims Valentine was the Bishop of Terni, also martyred by Claudius II on the outskirts of Rome. Because of the similarities of these accounts, it’s thought they may refer to the same person. Enough confusion surrounds the true identity of St. Valentine that the Catholic Church discontinued liturgical veneration of him in 1969, though his name remains on its list of officially recognized saints.

2. In all, there are about a dozen St. Valentines, plus a pope.
The saint we celebrate on Valentine’s Day is known officially as St. Valentine of Rome in order to differentiate him from the dozen or so other Valentines on the list. Because “Valentinus”—from the Latin word for worthy, strong or powerful—was a popular moniker between the second and eighth centuries A.D., several martyrs over the centuries have carried this name. The official Roman Catholic roster of saints shows about a dozen who were named Valentine or some variation thereof. The most recently beatified Valentine is St. Valentine Berrio-Ochoa, a Spaniard of the Dominican order who traveled to Vietnam, where he served as bishop until his beheading in 1861. Pope John Paul II canonized Berrio-Ochoa in 1988. There was even a Pope Valentine, though little is known about him except that he served a mere 40 days around A.D. 827.

3. Valentine is the patron saint of beekeepers and epilepsy, among many other things.
Saints are certainly expected to keep busy in the afterlife. Their holy duties include interceding in earthly affairs and entertaining petitions from living souls. In this respect, St. Valentine has wide-ranging spiritual responsibilities. People call on him to watch over the lives of lovers, of course, but also for interventions regarding beekeeping and epilepsy, as well as the plague, fainting and traveling. As you might expect, he’s also the patron saint of engaged couples and happy marriages.

4. You can find Valentine’s skull in Rome.
The flower-adorned skull of St. Valentine is on display in the Basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, Rome. In the early 1800s, the excavation of a catacomb near Rome yielded skeletal remains and other relics now associated with St. Valentine. As is customary, these bits and pieces of the late saint’s body have subsequently been distributed to reliquaries around the world. You’ll find other bits of St. Valentine’s skeleton on display in the Czech Republic, Ireland, Scotland, England and France.

5. Chaucer may have invented Valentine’s Day.
The medieval English poet Geoffrey Chaucer often took liberties with history, placing his poetic characters into fictitious historical contexts that he represented as real. No record exists of romantic celebrations on Valentine’s Day prior to a poem Chaucer wrote around 1375. In his work “Parliament of Foules,” he links a tradition of courtly love with the celebration of St. Valentine’s feast day–an association that didn’t exist until after his poem received widespread attention. The poem refers to February 14 as the day birds (and humans) come together to find a mate. When Chaucer wrote, “For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day / Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate,” he may have invented the holiday we know today.

6. You can celebrate Valentine’s Day several times a year.
Because of the abundance of St. Valentines on the Roman Catholic roster, you can choose to celebrate the saint multiple times each year. Besides February 14, you might decide to celebrate St. Valentine of Viterbo on November 3. Or maybe you want to get a jump on the traditional Valentine celebration by feting St. Valentine of Raetia on January 7. Women might choose to honor the only female St. Valentine (Valentina), a virgin martyred in Palestine on July 25, A.D. 308. The Eastern Orthodox Church officially celebrates St. Valentine twice, once as an elder of the church on July 6 and once as a martyr on July 30.
6 Surprising Facts about St. Valentine – Cited from: History.com By Elizabeth Hanes

Valentine’s Day Superstitions

It is said that the kind of bird a girl watches on Valentine’s Day predicts her future husband. For instance:

Sparrow: a poor man
Owl: remain spinster
Bluebird: a happy man
Blackbird: a priest or clergyman
Crossbill: an argumentative man

  • To be awoken by a kiss on Valentine’s Day is considered lucky.
  • On Valentine’s Day, the first guy’s name you read in the paper or hear on the TV or radio will be the name of the man you will marry.
  • If you see a squirrel on Valentine’s Day, you will marry a cheapskate who will hoard all your money.
  • If you see a goldfinch on Valentine’s Day, you will marry a millionaire.
  • If you see a robin on Valentine’s Day, you will marry a crime fighter – maybe they mean Batman!
  • If you see a flock of doves on Valentine’s Day, you will have a happy, peaceful marriage.
  • If you find a glove on the road on Valentine’s Day, your future beloved will have the other missing glove.

What are you up to tonight? Are you headed to The Krewe of The Knights of Santiago Knight Parade? Check out our blog we have help full info regarding parking and such! Happy St. Valentine’s Day from John Soliman and Associates!

Happy St Valentines Day - John Soliman and Associates HomeXpress Realty Inc

#valentinesday #Knightparade #gasparilla #love #valentine #valentinesdayfacts #johnsoliman @solimanmba

Search easily through homes that match your criteria:

Screen Shot 2015-01-20 at 12.07.35 PM

free-home-evaluation - John Soliman and Associates HomeXpress Realty Inc

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s